Fenny Shaw Cup-Mark, Bingley Moor, West Yorkshire

Cup-Marked Stone:  OS Grid Reference – SE 11271 43565

Also Known as:

  1. Carving no.112 (Boughey & Vickerman)

Getting Here

Close-up of 'cup-mark'
Close-up of ‘cup-mark’
Fenny Shaw Cup-Marked Stone

Follow the same directions to reach the Big Rock carving.  From here walk less than 100 yards up the slope, veering to your left and where you reach the rushes (Juncus grasses), walk up and keep your eyes peeled for the singular upright rock.  Or as ‘Redkiteyorks’ said, go “up the slope 82.4 metres, 54.5 degrees(True) from IAG108 (Big Rock).” It aint hard to find really…

Archaeology & History

Another stone mainly for the purists amongst you.  Little has been written on this possible carving.  Boughey & Vickerman (2003) said simply:

“Large rough rock. Two possible cups on top and one further possible cup on W vertical face. Doubtful”.

References:

  1. Boughey, K.J.S. & Vickerman, E.A., Prehistoric Rock Art of the West Riding, WYAS: Leeds 2003.
  2. Hedges, John (ed.), The Carved Rocks of Rombald’s Moor, WYMCC: Wakefield 1986.

© Paul Bennett, The Northern Antiquarian

Fenny Shaw CR

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Fenny Shaw CR 53.888149, -1.830003 Fenny Shaw CR

Big Rock, Fenny Shaw, Bingley Moor, West Yorkshire

Cup-and-Ring Stone:  OS Grid Reference – SE 11203 43517

Also Known as:

  1. Carving no.95 (Hedges)
  2. Carving no.108 (Boughey & Vickerman)

Getting Here

Big Stone Carving - looking SW
Big Rock Carving – looking SW

The best and easist way to get here is to drive west past Dick Hudson’s pub along the moor road for about a mile till you reach the left turn of Heights Lane. Stop here! (if you’re now going downhill to East Morton, you’ve gone past it) On the opposite side of the road is a gate and a footpath onto the moor at the spot called Fenny Shaw Low Well (small copse of woods adjacent to your right). Walk a quarter-mile up the path, bearing left where the path diverges (ignoring the ‘Private’ sign) and head for the derelict building. Less than 100 yards before it, notice the large boulder to your right, on the slope – that’s it!

Archaeology & History

Old inaccurate drawing of the cups, c.1982
Old inaccurate drawing, c.1982

I first came across this on one of my countless ambles on these moors as a teenager.  It was a cold, windy day as I recall – hence the reason for my sketch of the stone being a bit vague!  The bit of paper on which I drew it, was included in one of my unpublished hand-written booklets.  A few years later an image of the carving appeared in Mr Hedge’s (1986) fine collection, in much better detail than my scratty little pic!

Some of the cups highlighted
Some cup-marks highlighted

It’s a ‘big rock’ and stands out on the slope here.  There’s at least one complete cup-and-ring which is visible on the northern edge of the rock and there are between 17 and 30 other cups scattered across its surface, which has been greatly eroded by our timely forces of wind, rain, ice and snow.

Hedges’ 1986 sketch

In ambling around looking at the other stones in the vicinity, along with finding the small Littlestone cup-marked rock further up the slope, we also found, just below the faded old Big Stone, another quite large rock upon which, quite recently, someone has decided to etch four complete cup-and-ring symbols.  These appear to have been done either to,

i) assess degrees and speed of erosion on rock carvings;

or,

ii) pure artistry.

Whichever it may be (and there’s been various cries of “vandalism” when such carvings have been etched by some folk on otherwise virgin rock over the years), let it be known that the Big Stone’s partner was etched c.2008-9.  Does anyone out there know who did this ‘new’ carving?

References:

  1. Boughey, K.J.S. & Vickerman, E.A., Prehistoric Rock Art of the West Riding, WYAS: Leeds 2003.
  2. Hedges, John (ed.), The Carved Rocks of Rombald’s Moor, WYMCC: Wakefield 1986.

© Paul Bennett, The Northern Antiquarian

Big Rock CR

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Big Rock CR 53.887719, -1.831039 Big Rock CR