Chalkwell Hall, Southend-on-Sea, Essex

Tumulus (destroyed):  OS Grid Reference – TQ 861 862

Archaeology & History

Somewhere beneath the modern housing estate immediately east of Chalkwell Park was once a large prehistoric burial mound.  It was included in Wymer & Brown’s (1995) archaeological gazetteer (albeit at the wrong spot) without comment, but their reference led me to an early description of the place by Philip Benton (1867) whose description gave us the best info we have of the place.  He wrote:

“To the east of the present mansion, at the north-west comer of a field called Fishponds, is a tumulus or mound, probably Celtic.  This was first opened about thirty years ago, when bones, a few coins, and a piece of chain were discovered.  Since which period about eight feet of earth has been removed from the summit, when more bones were found, but as they were not inspected by any one competent to give an opinion, it is impossible to say whether they were those of man or beast.  The mound is still about four feet above the surrounding soil, and would probably repay further search.”

Wymer and Brown listed the site as being an “early Bronze Age” monument.

References:

  1. Benton, Philip, The History of Rochford Hundred – volume 2, Harrington: Rochford 1867.
  2. Wymer, J.J. & Brown, N.R., Excavations at North Shoebury, East Anglian Archaeology: Chelmsford 1995.

© Paul BennettThe Northern Antiquarian

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